Omega explore new depths with the extreme spec Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep
 

Omega explore new depths with the extreme spec Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep

3 min read
Richard Brown

Brands

Omega

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Industry News

Richard Brown

Brands

Omega

Categories

Industry News

Back in 2019 the Five Deeps Expedition Team was founded. The aim of the adventure was for a manned submarine to reach the five deepest parts of the Earth’s oceans. Travelling 47,000 miles and completing 39 dives, the expedition successfully descended to the bottom of each of the world’s five oceans, including the world’s deepest manned dive in history, to a new record 10,925 meters down into the Challenger Deep.

Omega CEO Raynald Aeschlicmann with the submersible. Note the Ultra Deep strapped to the claw. Credit: Omega

Strapped to a remote claw of the submarine was a unique, one off, Omega Seamaster – the prototype for the ULTRA DEEP. The watch was based on the glass viewport of the submersible, mirroring its design to withstand the huge pressure forces. Fully made from Titanium the unique case had revolutionary “Manta” lugs for added security. The prototype watch survived all dives and has become part of deep sea diving legend; every bit as much as the Rolex strapped to the DSRV Trieste 62 years ago.

                     DSV Limiting Factor. Credit: Five Deeps

Now in 2022 the record-breaking Five Deeps Ultra Deep watch has been redesigned and released for commercial sale. This stunning addition to the Seamaster Planet Ocean range is water-resistant to an eye watering 6,000 metres and fully certified to meet ISO 6425. The dials feature a transparent lacquer finish and in addition to the white dial, there is also the option of gradient-coloured dials, which transition from blue to black, or from grey to black. Ceramic bezels are fitted as standard. Six of the watches are crafted in new O-MEGASTEEL, a high-performance stainless steel alloy notable for its advanced strength and corrosion-resistance. Each watch has a beautiful Grade 5 Titanium case back, which has been laser-engraved with a Sonar emblem and the legendary OMEGA Hippocampus at the centre.

Omega Seamaster Planet-Ocean 6000m Ultra deep Titanium. Credit: Omega

The highlight of the new collection is a sand-blasted titanium model featuring a brushed ceramic bezel with a Liquidmetal™ diving scale and the distinctive “Manta Lugs” from the original watch that support a NATO strap. The dial is black titanium with cyan numerals and brushed hands and indexes.

All Ultra Deeps have a Master Chronometer self-winding Calibre 8912 movement with Co-Axial escapement and are resistant to magnetic fields reaching 15,000 gauss.

The range is not cheap. The steel model on a bracelet is £10,900 while the top of the range Titanium model will set you back £11,600. But that’s £300 less than the comparative Rolex.

Ultra Deep Case Back. Credit: Omega

What do we think of the Ultra Deep at first glance?

No question it is a stunning watch pitched firmly against the Rolex Deep Sea. It’s fair to argue that the Omega is a more contemporary and attractive watch than the Rolex which has a rather divisive oversize tool watch look. Bursting with different colours and strap options Omega have spared no imaginative capital to create a hugely wearable watch which will appeal to professional divers and land lovers. And that’s the key, most people who buy this probably won’t be divers. I know three people who own Rolex Deep Seas and none of them so much as put a toe in the ocean. Omega have taken this customer demographic into consideration and succeeded in making a beautiful dive watch without compromise.

Omega Seamaster - Planet Ocean 6000m. Credit: Omega

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Richard Brown

About the Author: Richard Brown

I truly believe one of the best partners in exploration and adventure is a fine watch. Over 30 years of collecting, my fascination with the technical capabilities of both vintage and modern timepieces has never abated and it is a privilege to be able to share this passion through writing.

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