Top Five Tudor Watches For Everyday Wear
 

Top Five Tudor Watches For Everyday Wear

4 min read
Rob Nudds

Brands

Tudor

Categories

Watch Buying Guide

Rob Nudds

Brands

Tudor

Categories

Watch Buying Guide

5. Tudor Pelagos FXD Chrono M25827KN-0001

Tudor Pelagos FXD Chrono M25827KN-0001Tudor Pelagos FXD Chrono M25827KN-0001 - Credit Tudor

It’s a bit odd for me to include an FXD on this list. The fixed-lug Pelagos is anything but versatile and doesn’t take kindly to high society. And yet, this new, ultra-lightweight, cycling-inspired, carbon-cased, moody beast is not only comfortable but also far smarter than the previous FXD releases. The cycling-specific tachymeter is also a lot of fun and a thoughtful edition. If you commute by bicycle, this could well be the beater you never knew you needed.

4. Tudor Pelagos M25600TN-0001 

Tudor Pelagos M25600TN-0001 - Credit Tudor

And now sanity returns. The Pelagos M25600TN-0001 is the original and best diver the brand makes at the end of the day. My personal favourite is the LHD version, but that’s down to the delight I take in creamy lume and roulette date wheels. For most people, the M25600TN-0001 is unbeatable. That’s something with which I would never argue.

Ten times better on the wrist than in any photo, this monochromatic diver is as robust as it is wearable. It also happens to be a low-key strap monster with its large but standard 22 mm lug width and neutral colour palette. Five grand of anyone’s money, well spent.

3. Tudor Black Bay Pro M79470-0003

Tudor Black Bay Pro M79470-0003Tudor Black Bay Pro M79470-0003 - Credit Tudor

 
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WatchGecko Ridge British Military Watch Strap - Black & Orange
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WatchGecko Ridge British Military Watch Strap - Navy & White
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WatchGecko Ridge British Military Watch Strap - Black & Red
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I’ve never been afraid of giving this watch a fair degree of criticism for looking too much like a mishmash of the Rolex Explorer II’s back catalogue, but if it were from any other brand (particularly Rolex itself), I’d probably be all for it.

What disappointed me about this watch was not the watch itself as an object or a tool or a potential daily companion (roles which I believe it fulfils admirably), but rather as a representative of an unambitious ideology that painted Tudor as a brand from the second row, standing behind Rolex, looking at its backside, instead of standing by its side and simply looking in a different direction. 

As a watch, however, it’s pretty damn good. It has a warm colourway, which I think will age well (both literally and metaphorically). Its 39 mm case is a welcome exercise in restraint and while its 14.6 mm thickness will horrify some, it wears very comfortably on both the leather strap and the bracelet. I might steer clear of the fabric on this occasion, however, as it does look a bit lost on that band.

2. Tudor Black Bay 36 M79640-0001

Tudor Black Bay 36 M79640-0001Tudor Black Bay 36 M79640-0001 - Credit Tudor

While I don’t think this current model is as good as the flat black dial version it replaced, it’s too good not to feature prominently on this list.

The five-link bracelet (which the brand staunchly refuses to call a Jubilee) is a nice addition to the line and the clasps remain industry-leaders at this price point. Finishing is excellent and versatility is high. If you, like me, pine for the discontinued “smiley”, never fear: that the old one is better than this slightly dressier model is not a universally held opinion so there are (and likely will be) plenty of opportunities to pick one up on the secondary market.

In the meantime, why not head down to your local AD and try on one of these new ones (and don’t ignore the blue — that one is arguably an upgrade from the old blue version)? 

1. Tudor Black Bay 54 M79000N-0001

Tudor Black Bay 54 M79000N-0001Tudor Black Bay 54 M79000N-0001 - Credit Tudor

Maybe you, like me, get a bit confused with the “year” number in these undersized Black Bay pieces and struggle to remember the diameters. The BB 58 is not 58 mm wide, thankfully. Nor is the BB 54 more than two inches across. In fact, at just 37 mm, it is one of the dinkiest, most beautiful creations off the wrist that a brand as big as Tudor has made for a long, long time. 

The problem with the watch on the wrist is that the broad bezel makes it appear even smaller than the 37 mm measurement. However, never fear: this issue is resolved by wearing the watch on the bracelet, which would generally be my preference for daily wear pieces where possible. The bracelet adds the necessary visual weight for this not to feel cartoonishly small and brings with it an intense mid-century character that works wonderfully with the colour scheme. 

It is as versatile and satisfying a piece as they come.

Bravo, Tudor.

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Rob Nudds

About the Author: Rob Nudds

Rob started working in the watch industry for the Signet Group, aged 17. Following university, he undertook the WOSTEP course at the British School of Watchmaking, developing a keen interest in watchmaking theory. After graduating, he worked primarily for Omega and Bremont before leaving the bench in 2015 to become Head of Sales for NOMOS Glashütte in the UK. After three years of managing an international retail network that grew to encompass 17 countries, he began writing full-time.

Since then, he has written for aBlogtoWatch, Fratello, Time & Tide, Grail Watch, SJX, Get Bezel, Borro Blog, Jomashop, Bob's Watches, Skolorr, Oracle Time, and Revolution USA.

He currently co-hosts The Real Time Show Podcast (www.therealtime.show) with his friend and long-time collaborator, Alon Ben Joseph of Ace Jewelers, Amsterdam, as well as working with several brands as a consultant in the fields of brand building, product development, global retail strategy, and communications. Follow him on Instagram @robnudds.

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